Posted by Ran Isner 

Last night I graduated to a white-blue belt in my Kickboxing practice. As part of the graduation process I was required to write an essay and do one hour of community service.
In the essay I was asked to write about what I have gained since beginning my practice and if I have noticed a change in myself. What came out were honest words of gratitude and acceptance. 

I am grateful because this practice has allowed me to join a community that embraces everyone with no judgement, a community that supports one another and not expects something in return and a community that reminds you that it’s not about the result, but about the process. 

The professor said something that even though I’ve heard it before, it resonated with me in that moment. He said that the week after earning the belt is very important. It is important because that is when people take their foot of the gas and decide that it’s time for a break and that’s why one should push even more. 

The work doesn’t stop just because you went up a belt (insert whatever accomplishment that suits your situation) if anything it becomes more intense and every level becomes more meaningful because it means that you are taking one step closer to where you want to be. Even after you are a black belt, the work always continues because we never stop learning.

Another thing I wrote about in my essay is how much this school is in alignment with who I am and who I am striving to become. I want to surround myself with people who share the same values as I do and are committed to creating a culture of empowerment and positivity. Building people up is so much more fun than tearing them down.

I am grateful every time I get on that mat and am looking forward to the journey ahead.

Advertisements

Push it!

July 27, 2016

Yesterday I went to my Kickboxing class and at the end of the class I said to the instructor “you know, I felt better in last week’s class” and he said to me “I think the reason why you felt the  last class was easier is because you pushed yourself harder this class”. I wasn’t aware I was pushing myself harder, but he most certainly did.

I was tired after class. I haven’t pushed myself this hard in a very long time and that is exactly why I joined this Dojo. I know myself well enough by now and I know that I require the structure of an instructor led class and I require to train with people who push me and motivate me. I require that community because that’s where I thrive. I enjoy seeing people achieve goals they never thought possible and it inspires me to do the same. For most of my life I have been part of a team, whether it was gymnastics, a youth singing group or as a part of an acting conservatory in college, I always enjoyed being part of a community.

In all of those different environments I was able to achieve success. I was national champion in gymnastics. I was in my element performing on stage with my friends at the youth singing group. In college I graduated with honors and earned a bachelor of fine arts degree. I know that it was because of the people I surrounded myself with.

Although I achieved all of this success, and I am finally in a space where I can acknowledge myself for it and not discount it and diminish it, I still struggle with self doubt and stepping into my greatness. The struggle doesn’t exist!Iit’s made up. Nothing is hard, we have been preconditioned to describe things as hard and as a struggle and we give it a negative connotation.

During class, the instructor keeps reminding us to smile because a smile is associated with a positive experience. There is no reason why pushing yourself to your limit should make you grimace instead of having a big old smile. After all, the reason we push ourselves beyond what we thought was possible is to better ourselves, it is to be the people we know deep in our core we were meant to be and that’s quite a reason to smile if you ask me.

Push it! And smile while you do it.

 

13680572_1604292616568118_4723045180549646472_n

The two newbies at Kickboxing with Sempai

%d bloggers like this: